ASSESSMENT AND DESCRIPTION OF PREHISTORIC WORKED FLINTS FROM BERRY 
HEAD, BRIXHAM (TORBAY): BRIXHAM HERITAGE MUSEUM EXCAVATIONS 2010 - 2012
By PHILIP L. ARMITAGE and TIM GENT
SUMMARY
This  report  presents  the  results  of  an  analysis  by  the  authors  of  a  collection  of  1,380  prehistoric 
worked  flints  from  excavations  carried  out  by  Brixham  Heritage  Museum  on  Berry  Head  (Brixham, 
Torbay),  2010  to  2012.  Debitage  (flint-knapping  waste  products)  predominates  the  collection, 
revealing initial working of raw materials and probable tool production occurred at the site. Among 
the relatively few tools recovered, three leaf-shaped arrowheads are indicative of an early Neolithic 
production.  Although  there  is  no  obvious  Mesolithic  component,  part  of  the  blade-rich  assemblage 
may date from this period. Whilst not as extensive a lithic assemblage as that from Churston Court 
Farm  (over  2,408  worked  flints  and  eight  stone  axes;  Pearson  1981)  the  Berry  Head  material 
nevertheless has contributed to our knowledge of prehistoric activity at the southern end of Torbay.

INTRODUCTION
Grants received from the Council for British Archaeology (CBA) Challenge Fund and Torbay Coast 
and  Countryside  Trust  
(TCCT)  enabled  the  curator  of  Brixham  Heritage  Museum,  Philip  Armitage, 
to identify, catalogue and carry out a detailed study of a collection of prehistoric worked flints, with 
the assistance of archaeological consultant Tim Gent (Archaedia, Winkleigh, Devon). These ancient 
flints were recovered from Berry Head, Brixham (Torbay, Devon) during excavations carried out by 
the Museum's volunteer archaeological team directed by Armitage, in 2010 and 2011 (NGR centred 
on SX 9389 5649) and 2012 (NGR centred on SX 9388 5650). 
Background to the site excavations and methodology
A series of excavations started in 2000 located buried structural remains and refuse dumps associated 
with two Victorian cottages built at the edge of Berry Head Common (Figure 1) (see P. L. Armitage 
and K. H. Armitage 2005). The more recent excavations of 2010 and 2011, in addition to producing 
evidence of activity at the site in Napoleonic, Victorian and WW2 times, yielded small quantities of 
prehistoric worked flints, indicating the potential of the site to provide evidence of prehistoric activity 
in the area. Prompted by these lithic discoveries a more extensive excavation was conducted during 
2012, which yielded considerably more worked flints, bringing the total number recovered to 1,380. 
The greatest proportion of the flints, 1,188 (86 %) came from the fine-grained, reddish-brown gritty 
sandy  layer,  immediately  overlying  the  Devonian  limestone  bedrock  (Figure  2).  This  soil  horizon 
(designated as context 104) includes a component from the weathered cap of the adjacent Neptunian 
dyke (identified by Dr Chris Proctor) situated on the southern edge of the excavated area, at NGR SX 
93892 56496. Almost exclusively devoid of finds other than the flints (except in a limited area on the 
south western side of the enclosure near the gateway, where there were small intrusive fragments of 
Victorian pottery present), context 104 is believed to be an essentially securely stratified remnant of 
the old prehistoric land surface, which preserves an undisturbed spatial pattern of flint deposition.  In 
order to maximise recovery of the flints, the layer was carefully hand towelled down to the surface of 
the  underlying  bedrock,  with  the  removed  spoil  sieved  through  5mm  and  2mm  meshes.  There  were 
also 192 flints (14%/total) recovered from reworked soil/dumped deposits (context nos. 98, 100, 103, 
150/151 & 231) containing Napoleonic era and/or Victorian potsherds/artefacts. These contexts were 
again hand towelled and the spoil processed through 5 mm mesh sieves. Recording of the locations of 
the flints in the field allowed their spatial distribution pattern across the excavated area to be mapped 
(Figure 3).
Analysis and results
A  sample  of  428  flints  was  sent  to  Tim  Gent  (Archaedia)  for  initial  assessment  and  identification, 
followed  by  full  post-excavation  processing  (identification,  cataloguing  and  analysis)  at  Brixham 
Heritage  Museum.  Classification  of  the  flints  during  processing  followed  the  terminology  of  Ballin 
(2000). Measurements were taken on selected flints using Draper dial callipers (graduated 0.02 mm). 
Weights of the cores were obtained using a Truweigh digital scale (250g x 0.1 g). 
The  collection,  together  with  the  catalogue,  is  held  by  Brixham  Heritage  Museum.  Under  the 
recording  system  of  the  museum,  the  collection  has  been  assigned  Accession  Nos.  7853.1  to 
7853.285. 
Table 1 summarises the categories of flints from each excavated context. 
DESCRIPTIONS OF THE LITHICS
Apart  from  several  grey  cherty  specimens,  the  flints  are  whitened  by  patination,  with  many  also 
exhibiting  dark  blotching/dendritic  surface  patterning  due  to  iron-oxide  (haematite)  staining, 
reflecting  post-depositional  effects  from  the  iron  rich  nature  of  the  soil  from  the  proximity  to  the 
Neptunian  dyke.  A  mid-grey  flint  is  exposed  in  the  limited  cases  where  the  patination  has  been 
removed or is partial. Where present, the cortex is heavily abraded and the beach pebble origin of the 
raw material is obvious. Signs of burning are seen in 29 pieces.
Debitage (knapping by-products)
Cores  -  Thirty  two  cores  are  present.  Five  of  these  are  bashed,  heavily  reduced  lumps  with  no 
perceptible  platforms  remaining  and  represent  cores  that  seemingly  were  worked  to  exhaustion, 
perhaps  indicating  a  desire  by  the  flint  knapper  to  maximise  the  use  of  a  limited  source  of  raw 
material. Of the remaining 27, the majority are of the single-platform type with flakes/blades removed 
part of way round (Class A2, system of Clark et al 1960: 216). Three selected examples are illustrated 
in Figure 4 Nos. 8, 9 & 10. 
Omitting the bashed/exhausted specimens, the cores averaged in weight 51.1 g (range 13.0 g to 116.7 
g, standard deviation 28.98, N = 27). In comparison, the bashed/exhausted specimens averaged 16.5 g 
(range 3.0 g to 29.4 g, N = 5). 
Flakes - There are 91 primary flakes, 28 blade core trimming flakes and 939 secondary & tertiary 
flakes.
Blades - A total of 126 blades or broken blades are present, many displaying proximal ends with 
well-prepared striking positions.
Chips - 151 very small struck flint pieces, with greatest diameters less than 10 mm, were collected at 
the site, both from sieving and by hand troweling.  
Tools
Only 13 finished or partly-finished tools are included in the collection:
Arrowheads  (3)  -  An  example  of  a  finished  leaf-shaped  arrow  head  of  high  quality  is  represented 
(7853.208), measuring 28.8 mm long x 16.0 mm wide (Figure 4.5); which has the edges strengthened 
by retouch and with invasive retouching across both surfaces. This specimen is similar to Green type 
3B example Q, of unusual shape: small, with "teardrop" tip combined with a pointed butt. The Berry 
Head specimen resembles arrowhead 4 from Salcombe Hill, Sidmouth (Pollard and Luxton 1978: Fig. 
2.4, p.185).
The remaining two probable arrowheads are also very small and simple diamond shaped projectiles, 
with  only  very  minor  retouching  along  each  side.  The  retouching  does  not  extend  for  any  distance 
across the flat surface of these arrowheads.  The smaller example (7853.240) (Figure 4.7) measuring 
17.3  mm  x  14.5  mm,  has  what  appears  to  be  a  broken  butt.    The  lack  of  intrusive  flaking,  and  the 
relatively thick butt of the larger example (7853.25) (Figure 4.6) (21.5 mm x 18.3 mm) may indicate 
that  these  are  unfinished  rough  outs.    The  apparent  breakage  to  the  smaller  piece  may  well  be  the 
reason that it was abandoned.  Although unfinished, in size and shape the intact piece (7853.25) bears 
some resemblance to the more finished arrowhead 84 from Poldowrian in Cornwall (Olaf Bayer pers. 
comm.; Smith and Harris 1982). 
Backed knife - A single heavily patinated backed knife with steep retouch on the edge was recovered 
(7853.46), measuring 55.2 mm x 29.5 mm x 8.3 mm. Figure 4.1. 
Scrapers (4) - Among the four recovered examples there is a composite scraper (7853.229) measuring 
58.9 mm x 37.0 mm x 15.8 mm. Figure 4.2.
Point/awl  - The single specimen recovered (7853.12) is strongly pointed and exhibits a strong whitish 
patination.   Figure 4.3.
Notched flakes (3)  - Three specimens are present Including 7853.15 of mid mottled grey black flint 
with retouching. Figure 4.4.
Chopping  tool   - There  is  a  large  (79.3  mm  x  59.6  mm  x  42.2  mm)  bifacially  flaked,  chopping  tool 
made on a beach pebble (7853.246) of pale grey colouration with cortex present. Figure 5.
INTERPRETATION and DISCUSSION 
The  presence  of  cores  and  significant  amounts  of  flint  knapping  waste  with  high  proportions  of 
primary flakes, reveal that initial reduction of raw material was taking place on site. This is perhaps 
not  surprising  considering  the  obvious  pebble-flint  origins.  Tool  production  may  also  have  taken 
place. The presence of scrapers suggests some domestic activity, such as animal skin/hide preparation 
or  food  processing,  was  also  taking  place  in  the  vicinity,  and  the  presence  of  burnt  flint  supports 
this  probable  indication  of  some  form  of  settlement.  The  notched  flakes  possibly  were  intended  to 
trim/smooth  slender  sticks  such  as  arrow  shafts,  as  suggested  by  Pollard  and  Luxton  (1978:  184) 
for  similarly  modified  flakes  from  Salcombe  Hill,  Sidmouth.  On  the  basis  of  their  dimensions,  all 
three leaf-shaped arrowheads from the site fall within the domestic category defined by Devaney, R. 
2005: 11 - 12, who observed that unlike the longer and broader purely ceremonial form, these smaller 
arrowheads were less easily damaged  and more efficient when used in hunting or warfare
Considering the date of the recovered material, the presence of the crudely fashioned pebble chopping 
tool  provides  no  chronological  insight  as  such  forms  are  found  in  Lower  Palaeolithic  as  well  as 
Mesolithic  lithic  assemblages  (Palmer  1977:  29  -  30)  and  there  is  even  an  Iron  Age  example  from 
Jeavons Lane, Cambridgeshire (Fig. 27.5,p.67; Leivers 2009:78). Nor does the presence of patination 
provide  a  pointer  as  to  the  age  of  the  Berry  Head  flints.  Contrary  to  the  tendency  of  many  workers 
who  have  viewed  the  presence  or  absence  of  patination  as  an  indicator  of  relative  age  in  lithic 
material,  recent  research  (Glauberman  &  Thorson  2012)  demonstrated  the  incidence  and  degree 
of  patination  in  prehistoric  flints  is  due  to  complex  post-depositional  processes,  reflecting  local 
geochemical influences. Based on this latest research, it is suggested the location of the Berry Head 
lithic material in a horizon directly overlying the limestone bedrock and proximity to the Neptunian 
Permian sandstone dyke most likely explains the occurrence of patination. 
The  leaf-shaped  arrowheads  however  are  clearly  indicative  of  an  early  Neolithic  production,  and 
the  apparent  preference  for  blade  production  would  also  fit  a  flint  working  technology  of  this  date.   
No  obvious  indication  of  Mesolithic  component,  such  as  microliths  or  microlith  production  waste 
(microburins)  has  been  identified,  but  this  might  well  not  be  present  in  a  collection  of  this  size  and 
cannot be taken as evidence that humans were absent from this prominent location at that time.  At 
least part of this blade-rich assemblage may date from this period.  
Further  excavations  are  planned  at  the  site  and  may  produce  additional  lithic  evidence  which  could 
perhaps clarify the dating and nature of the site occupation in the prehistoric period and also pinpoint 
specifically  where  the  tool  production  had  taken  place  through  application  of  analysis  of  debitage 
dispersal  (see  Kvamme  1997).  A  further  aspect  meriting  attention  and  resolution  is  to  determine 
where exactly was the location(s) of the source of beach pebbles/cobbles utilized for the tool making.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Grateful  thanks  goes  to  Brixham  Heritage  Museum's  volunteer  Archaeological  Team  whose 
enthusiastic  dedication  and  unstinted  efforts  in  the  field  were  responsible  for  recovering  the  flints. 
Former head countryside ranger at the Berry Head National Nature Reserve Nigel Smallbones and his 
staff  greatly  assisted  the  site  investigations.  Torquay  Museum  Young  Explorers  Club  members  also 
participated. Sincere thanks to Kate Armitage for the flint drawings and to Robert Rouse for the site 
plans/section profile. Technical advice was kindly provided by Dr Chris Proctor, Dr Olaf Bayer and 
Karl Lee (flint knapper). Thanks are also due to Gill Bedford and Louise Cresswell for assistance in 
cataloguing the lithic collection. 
For  funding  the  post-excavation  analysis  costs  we  acknowledge  and  thank  the  Council  for  British 
Archaeology Challenge Fund and Torbay Coast and Countryside Trust. Brixham Heritage Museum is 
supported by Torbay Council. 
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Unpublished sources
Gent, T. 2012  Berry Head Flint Assessment. Report on file: Brixham Heritage Museum.
Proctor, C. 2010  Report on Iron Concretions from the Berry Head Cottage Excavation. Report on 
file: Brixham Heritage Museum.
Published references cited
Armitage, P. L. and Armitage, K. H.  2005  A rare temperance teacup.  Council for British 
Archaeology South-West Journal No. 15 - Summer, AD2005
: 27 - 30.
Ballin, T. B. 2000   Classification and description of lithic artefacts: a discussion of the basic lithic 
terminology. Lithics: The Journal of the Lithic Studies Society 21: 9 - 15.
Berridge, P. J. and Simpson, S. J. 1992   The Mesolithic, Neolithic and Early Bronze Age Site at 
Bulleigh Meadow, Marldon. Devon Archaeological Society Proceedings No. 50: 1 -  18.
Clark, J. G. D., Higgs, E. S. And Longworth, I. H. 1960  Excavations at the Neolithic site at Hurst 
Fen, Mildenhall, Suffolk (1954, 1957 and 1958) Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society vol. 26: 202 -  
245.
Devaney, R. 2005  Ceremonial and domestic flint arrowheads. Lithics: The Journal of the Lithic 
Studies Society
 26: 9 - 22.
Glauberman, P. J. and Thorson, R. M. 2012  Flint patina as an aspect of 'flaked stone taphonomy': a 
case study from the loess terrain of the Netherlands and Belgium. Journal of Taphonomy volume 10 
(issue 1): 21 - 43.
Green, H. S. 1980  The Flint Arrowheads of the British Isles, Part i. Oxford: B. A. R. British Series 
75 (i).
Kvamme, K. L. 1997  Patterns and models of debitage dispersal in percussion flaking. Lithic 
Technology, volume 22, no. 2
: 122 - 136.
Leivers, M. 2009  Later Prehistoric material culture pp. 74 - 78 in J. Wright, M. Leivers, R. S. Smith 
and C. J. Stevens Bambourne New Settlement. Iron Age and Romano-British Settlement on the Clay 
Uplands of West Cambridgeshire. Wessex Archaeology Report No. 23.
Palmer, S. 1977  Mesolithic Cultures of Britain. Poole, Dorset: Dolphin Press.
Pearson,  M.  P.  1981    A  Neolithic  and  Bronze  Age  site  at  Churston,  South  Devon.  Devon 
Archaeological Society Proceedings No. 39
: 17 - 26.
Pollard, S. and Luxton, S  1978  Neolithic and Bronze Age occupation on Salcombe Hill, Sidmouth. 
Devon Archaeological Society Proceedings No. 36: 181 - 190.
Smith, G. and Harris, D. The excavations of Mesolithic, Neolithic and Bronze Age Settlements at 
Poldowrian, St Keverne, 1980
.  Cornwall Archaeology, 84, 23-66.
AUTHORS
Addresses: Philip L. Armitage, Curator, Brixham Heritage Museum, Brixham, Devon TQ5 8LZ, UK, 
e-mail: mail@brixhamheritage.org.uk; Tim Gent, Archaedia, Roseleigh, Winkleigh, Devon EX19 8EY, 
e-mail: tim@archaedia.co.uk
CAPTIONS TO THE FIGURES
Figure 1: Berry Head: site location. 
Figure 2: Berry Head: section profile.
Figure 3: Berry Head: plan showing distribution of the prehistoric worked flints
Figure 4: Berry Head: drawings of selected flints. 
Figure 5: Berry Head: chopping tool